Animal & Pet Charms

animal-charms-mother

Animal & Pet Charms

Xinar has one of the most significant and most exciting collections of 925 sterling silver charms on this side of the internet. We have been selling jewelry-making supplies since 1998, and for over twenty years, we have provided only the highest quality pendants and charms to DIY crafters and jewelry makers all over the U.S. and the world.


We believe that crafters deserve only the best. Hence, it’s essential that you also know that our silver manufacturer adheres to strict FTC guidelines regarding hypoallergenic Silver and nickel-free Silver. So if you need sterling silver that won’t cause itching and rashes, choose Xinar’s online charms store.


Silver, sterling, and sterling silver are all terms used to denote 92.5 percent pure silver products. Silver items may be marked 925, which indicates that there are 925 parts per thousand of pure silver in the product. According to the law, silver objects must also display the name or U.S. registered trademark of the company or person who stands behind the mark. A layer of silver is added to the base metal in some “silver plate” jewelry. The term “coin silver” refers to items constructed of 90% pure silver.

What is Lost Wax Casting?

The lost wax casting process is used to create the sterling silver charms in Xinar’s vast range of bracelet charms. In addition, jewelry findings such as conchos are also made using a unique stamping procedure called the die stamping process. On the other hand, the die stamping procedure is employed for both Silver and gold-filled beads.

Customers are generally unaware of how difficult it is to create silver charms. Master silver casters are responsible for carving the designs to make the master mold first, which results in these tiny, flawless bracelet charms.

Although 3D printing has sped up the process, skillful silversmithing and casting are still required to create classic silver charms worthy of people’s workbenches. Following the completion of the metal master, a master mold is made to pour the molten silver.

The master mold is duplicated in wax and enclosed in a plaster cast. The wax is melted away afterward, which gave the process its unique name – lost wax casting. Finally, the model is spun in molten silver (1600° Fahrenheit) by a centrifuge. Before being transferred down the line for polishing and finishing, the resulting charm is despurred. Putting a five- or ten-dollar silver charm on someone’s wrist or neck is a lot of work, indeed, and Xinar is quite proud that our charms go through such an exact and laborious process, as we are committed to quality at all times.

Nickel allergy is one of the most prevalent allergies linked to jewelry. There are currently no federal laws governing nickel content in jewelry. Therefore, nickel testing is essential if you promote and label your jewelry as “nickel-free.” For the manufacturer or seller to make such claims, the jewelry items must have a nickel content of less than 0.01 percent. In addition, the European Union has severe limits for nickel content in jewelry, and the United States uses these as the basis for its test criteria.

Buying Sterling Silver Jewelry?

The first step is always research. Compare the quality, pricing, and service offered by various stores. Consider seeking references from family, friends, or coworkers. If you’re not familiar with a vendor, conduct a web search to learn more about them. In a search engine, type in the seller’s name and the words “complaint” or “review.” If you’re shopping in a physical store, have your salesperson jot down any information you’ll need to decide. And, before you hand over your cash, inquire about the store’s refund and return policies.

Learn some jewelry vocabulary, too. Jewelry is made of gold, and silver has its jargon. Some phrases, such as “solid gold” or “gold-plated,” may not have the same meaning as you assume. The markings indicate the worth of platinum jewelry on it. Understanding the terminology used to describe jewelry can assist you in avoiding overpaying.

How To Spot Fake Silver?

We love the beauty of sterling silver flatware, vases, jewelry, and decorative elements because it catches the light like no other metal. However, real silver has a high market value. Thus things manufactured of it are more expensive than those that only resembles silver. Knowing whether or not something is composed of silver is crucial for reasons other than cost: If you have a metal sensitivity, be sure your jewelry is real silver if you wish to wear it without having a poor response.

You can get some fantastic prices on silver by shopping at flea markets, estate sales, and yard sales, but you must know what to look for.

Dealers don’t always know what they have, so don’t leave anything to chance!” Like other precious metals, silver has distinguishing characteristics that can aid in its identification. These tests can help you determine if the object you’re holding is genuine silver or a convincing imitation.

Hallmarks

On the surface, look for any actual stamps or markings. For example, when you suspect an item is a real silver, the first thing you should spot are indicators such as a hallmark or stamp.

In many countries, a silver object intended for commercial sale is stamped with one or more silver hallmarks indicating the purity of the metal, the manufacturer’s or silversmith’s mark, and other markings indicating the year of manufacturing and additional information about the piece. For example, international dealers will stamp silver with the numbers 925, 900, or 800. These values indicate the purity of silver. The purity of sterling silver is 92.5 percent or greater.

The Magnet Test

Like most precious metals such as gold and copper, silver is nonmagnetic. Take a few magnets and test if they stick to your object. Unlike cobalt, nickel, or iron, silver is not magnetic and only exhibits weak magnetic effects. Your magnet has a ferromagnetic core and is not silver if it sticks firmly to the object. Other metals are commonly used to make fake silver or silver-plated products. This simple test will tell you whether your item is genuine silver or not.

The Silver Odor Test

Because sterling silver has no odor, you can smell the object in question. Is there a distinct odor to it? It’s not sterling silver if you can smell sulfur or a different metallic scent. The thing may be silver-plated, but a fragrance suggests that it’s not comprised of sterling silver. This is an excellent exam for those with a keen sense of smell.

The Polished Look Test

It is necessary to polish silver regularly. Pull out the soft white cloth you brought with you after inspecting for stamps and markings and using the magnet trick. Silver oxidizes and tarnishes as well. As if polishing, rub the tarnished piece. It’s not silver if there’s no black residue on your fabric. If the silver piece has been polished, that is a strong indicator of its genuineness. The rust or a lack of oxidation suggests that the item is not made of silver.

The Flake Test

Some goods may be silver-plated, meaning that a layer of genuine silver has been applied. Is there a different metal underneath the flakes on the item? Is it possible to scrape it with your fingernail and see an additional material beneath it? Although the item is silver-plated, it is not sterling silver. You might also dissolve a couple of the flakes in acid. If the acid is pure silver, the hue should not change. Of course, this isn’t a test you can do in the store, so only use it on items you already own.

The Ice Test

To do this test, you’ll need access to ice: place a cube of ice on top of the silver item. The heat conductivity of silver is the highest of any typical metal or alloy. Even at room temperature, genuine silver goods will melt ice at a breakneck speed. It’s probably silver if it melts quickly(er). It’s a simple, effective method for determining whether you’re dealing with genuine sterling silver or a sophisticated forgery.

Animal Imagery in Western Art

Animals are widely used as subject matter by artists. Animals have appeared in paintings, sculptures, and prints throughout history. Animals serve as metaphors as well. Throughout history, many civilizations have associated individual animals with gods, power, the supernatural, and, in the case of Native Americans, names.

This page is a list of animals and what they represent to many cultures throughout history.

Animals are widely used as subject matter by artists. Animals have appeared in paintings, sculptures, and prints throughout history. Animals serve as metaphors as well. Throughout history, many civilizations have associated individual animals with gods, power, the supernatural, and, in the case of Native Americans, names.

Is a dog just a dog in art? Certainly not in the history of European art, where a canine on canvas can express a wide range of emotions, from fidelity to deceit to seduction. While these divergent interpretations may appear to muddle a painting's message, they are also indicative of animal symbolism in Western art.

Since classical antiquity, European painters have attributed meaning to actual and imaginary creatures. The Bestiary, an illustrated reference that supplied natural history and moral connections for a wide range of creatures, was published in the 12th century, formalizing specific interpretations. Artists such as Leonardo da Vinci created their own renditions of the Bestiary throughout the Renaissance. Finally, in the 16th century, Venetian masters such as Titian continued the practice by making works with symbolic animals. Inspired by this history, we've put together a list of seven animals—from peacocks to ermines—and what they mean when painted.

In the winter, the pelt of a stoat changes from brown to white, earning it the nickname "ermine." It was thought that if the animal's pristine coat was dirty, it would die soon, making it a prime emblem of purity (and occasionally justice).

Dogs haven't always been man's best friend, at least in art. Their associated attributes ranged from alertness, fidelity, and wisdom to rage, lechery, and avarice from classical antiquity to the Renaissance. For his Last Supper scenario, Titian drew on a medieval view of the dog as dangerous, partnering Judas with a canine to symbolize the disciple's betrayal of Jesus. These implications, on the other hand, were diluted in Renaissance portraiture. Instead, dogs came to represent fidelity and female seduction, as seen in Jan van Eyck's painting of a married couple.

Because of the rabbit's long-standing reputation for fertility, it became a clear emblem of passion. It frequently appears alongside Venus in Renaissance paintings; in Titian's sensual paintings, couples of rabbits or deer inhabit the corners. A rabbit at the Blessed Virgin’s feet, on the other hand, was supposed to symbolise victory over sexual desire. However, a legend about rabbits being able to reproduce without a mate led to a different interpretation: the animal represented virgin birth and virtue in general.

A little bird—a goldfinch or a robin, depending on the version—swooped down over Christ as he borne the cross and removed a thorn from his crown, according to mythology. A drop of blood landed on its feathers, resulting in the crimson coloration that both birds now have.

Monkeys were once thought to be symbols of the devil by Christians in the early Middle Ages, but that negative connotation was later changed. In Renaissance art, these animals were frequently used as stand-ins for humans. A fettered monkey depicted mankind enslaved by worldly, base aspirations, while an ape grasping an apple represented the fall of man. Monkeys were also associated with depictions of painting and sculpting—skills that were seen as imitative and hence denoted by an animal that was frequently regarded as a copycat.

With its remarkable ability to replicate the human speech, the parrot was connected with eloquence. Hendrik Martenszoon Sorgh intended this concept to be conveyed in this 17th-century portrait of a man, most likely a Protestant preacher and theologian. However, it has theological connotations, particularly the Immaculate Conception and the Virgin Mary, which was seen as a reference to conception through God's Word rather than physical methods. This particular bird is also facing a portrait of the Madonna and Child, emphasizing its sacred motherhood link even more.

The peacock, a brilliantly colored bird that became a symbol of immortality in Christian art due to the ancient belief that its flesh never decomposed, became the symbol of immortality in Christian art. It's positioned in most Renaissance nativity scenes as a reminder of Christ's resurrection and, by extension, eternal life. The peacock's proclivity for strutting while flaunting its showy tail led to connections with pride and vanity, though these are far less common in European art at the time.

Animals are widely used as subject matter by artists. Animals have appeared in paintings, sculptures, and prints throughout history. Animals serve as metaphors as well. Throughout history, many civilizations have associated individual animals with gods, power, the supernatural, and, in the case of Native Americans, names.

This page is a list of animals and what they represent to many cultures throughout history.

Animals are widely used as subject matter by artists. Animals have appeared in paintings, sculptures, and prints throughout history. Animals serve as metaphors as well. Throughout history, many civilizations have associated individual animals with gods, power, the supernatural, and, in the case of Native Americans, names.

Is a dog just a dog in art? Certainly not in the history of European art, where a canine on canvas can express a wide range of emotions, from fidelity to deceit to seduction. While these divergent interpretations may appear to muddle a painting's message, they are also indicative of animal symbolism in Western art.

Since classical antiquity, European painters have attributed meaning to actual and imaginary creatures. The Bestiary, an illustrated reference that supplied natural history and moral connections for a wide range of creatures, was published in the 12th century, formalizing specific interpretations. Artists such as Leonardo da Vinci created their own renditions of the Bestiary throughout the Renaissance. Finally, in the 16th century, Venetian masters such as Titian continued the practice by making works with symbolic animals. Inspired by this history, we've put together a list of seven animals—from peacocks to ermines—and what they mean when painted.

In the winter, the pelt of a stoat changes from brown to white, earning it the nickname "ermine." It was thought that if the animal's pristine coat was dirty, it would die soon, making it a prime emblem of purity (and occasionally justice).

Dogs haven't always been man's best friend, at least in art. Their associated attributes ranged from alertness, fidelity, and wisdom to rage, lechery, and avarice from classical antiquity to the Renaissance. For his Last Supper scenario, Titian drew on a medieval view of the dog as dangerous, partnering Judas with a canine to symbolize the disciple's betrayal of Jesus. These implications, on the other hand, were diluted in Renaissance portraiture. Instead, dogs came to represent fidelity and female seduction, as seen in Jan van Eyck's painting of a married couple.

Because of the rabbit's long-standing reputation for fertility, it became a clear emblem of passion. It frequently appears alongside Venus in Renaissance paintings; in Titian's sensual paintings, couples of rabbits or deer inhabit the corners. A rabbit at the Blessed Virgin’s feet, on the other hand, was supposed to symbolise victory over sexual desire. However, a legend about rabbits being able to reproduce without a mate led to a different interpretation: the animal represented virgin birth and virtue in general.

A little bird—a goldfinch or a robin, depending on the version—swooped down over Christ as he borne the cross and removed a thorn from his crown, according to mythology. A drop of blood landed on its feathers, resulting in the crimson coloration that both birds now have.

Monkeys were once thought to be symbols of the devil by Christians in the early Middle Ages, but that negative connotation was later changed. In Renaissance art, these animals were frequently used as stand-ins for humans. A fettered monkey depicted mankind enslaved by worldly, base aspirations, while an ape grasping an apple represented the fall of man. Monkeys were also associated with depictions of painting and sculpting—skills that were seen as imitative and hence denoted by an animal that was frequently regarded as a copycat.

With its remarkable ability to replicate the human speech, the parrot was connected with eloquence. Hendrik Martenszoon Sorgh intended this concept to be conveyed in this 17th-century portrait of a man, most likely a Protestant preacher and theologian. However, it has theological connotations, particularly the Immaculate Conception and the Virgin Mary, which was seen as a reference to conception through God's Word rather than physical methods. This particular bird is also facing a portrait of the Madonna and Child, emphasizing its sacred motherhood link even more.

The peacock, a brilliantly colored bird that became a symbol of immortality in Christian art due to the ancient belief that its flesh never decomposed, became the symbol of immortality in Christian art. It's positioned in most Renaissance nativity scenes as a reminder of Christ's resurrection and, by extension, eternal life. The peacock's proclivity for strutting while flaunting its showy tail led to connections with pride and vanity, though these are far less common in European art at the time.

Sterling Silver Bird Charms

Sterling Silver Barnyard Animals and Pets

Sterling Silver Sea Life & Seashore Charms

  • Sting Ray Charm Sterling Silver

    $9.95

    Sting Ray Charm for sea-life or seashore-themed jewelry. Quality sterling silver casting, made in the USA, 5/8″ x 1 – 1/8″, 3-D casting. Feedback received on this charm includes beautiful detail, high quality, better than expected!!

  • Squid Charm Sterling Silver

    $7.75

    Squid Charm for sea-life or seashore-themed jewelry. Quality sterling silver casting, made in the USA, 1/2″ x 1″, 3-D casting. Feedback received on this charm includes beautiful detail, high quality, better than expected!!

  • Sand Dollar Charm Sterling Silver

    $6.25

    Sanddollar Charm for sea-life or seashore-themed jewelry. Quality sterling silver casting, made in the USA, 3/4″ x 7/8″, 3-D casting. Feedback received on this charm includes beautiful detail, high quality, better than expected!!

  • Trout Charm Sterling Silver

    $5.25

    Trout Charm for sea-life or seashore-themed jewelry. Quality sterling silver casting, made in the USA, 1/2″ x 1/2″, 3-D casting. Feedback received on this charm includes beautiful detail, high quality, better than expected!!

Sterling Silver Animals of the World Charms

Sterling Silver Bird Charms

Sterling Silver Barnyard Animals and Pets

Sterling Silver Sea Life & Seashore Charms

  • Sting Ray Charm Sterling Silver

    $9.95

    Sting Ray Charm for sea-life or seashore-themed jewelry. Quality sterling silver casting, made in the USA, 5/8″ x 1 – 1/8″, 3-D casting. Feedback received on this charm includes beautiful detail, high quality, better than expected!!

  • Squid Charm Sterling Silver

    $7.75

    Squid Charm for sea-life or seashore-themed jewelry. Quality sterling silver casting, made in the USA, 1/2″ x 1″, 3-D casting. Feedback received on this charm includes beautiful detail, high quality, better than expected!!

  • Sand Dollar Charm Sterling Silver

    $6.25

    Sanddollar Charm for sea-life or seashore-themed jewelry. Quality sterling silver casting, made in the USA, 3/4″ x 7/8″, 3-D casting. Feedback received on this charm includes beautiful detail, high quality, better than expected!!

  • Trout Charm Sterling Silver

    $5.25

    Trout Charm for sea-life or seashore-themed jewelry. Quality sterling silver casting, made in the USA, 1/2″ x 1/2″, 3-D casting. Feedback received on this charm includes beautiful detail, high quality, better than expected!!

Sterling Silver Animals of the World Charms